Affordable Care Act and what it actually brings to women

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In this Jan. 31, 2017, photo, Rachel Potter holds her son, Jude, at their home in Nashville, Tenn. Potter, a Nashville-based singer who has toured the country as part of the cast of the hit musical "Wicked" as well as performing gigs with her country music band Steel Union, said she couldn't afford insurance before the Affordable Care Act. From a return to higher premiums based on female gender, to gaps in coverage for breast pumps used by nursing mothers, President Donald Trump's vow to repeal his predecessor's health care law is raising concerns about the impact on women's health. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

From a return to higher premiums for women to gaps in coverage for birth control and breast pumps, the Republican push to repeal the healthcare legal act applied by the administration of the previous POTUS. The 2010 law ended a common industry practice according to which men were charged more seldom than women purchased directly from an insurer. It made motherhood and childcare a required benefit for individual market health plans. And it set a list of preventive services to be provided at no extra cost to women, including birth control and breast pumps used by nursing mothers. That preventive care requirement also applies to most employer plans, which serve a majority of U.S. adults. Nearly half of pregnancies are unplanned, and prior to “Obamacare” some women would get pregnant only to learn that their insurance did not cover maternity and delivery, said Dr. John Meigs, a longtime family practitioner in the small town of Centerville, Ala.

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